internet

Context of Online Communication: A Communicative Dilemma

Now that we are reassured to rely on the written text for communication on the Web (see the previous posting), we may move towards another important aspect that Web authors must be aware of. Kana et al. (2003) have described a communicative dilemma of Web texts (and written text in general) that represents THE competitive challenge in writing for the Web.

2007-07-05 18:57 | ,

The Role of Written Text for Online Communication

According to Book recommendation / advertisement: Buy this book at amazon.com/.co.uk/.de! Kana et al. (2003), critics of our modern culture find fault with lacking ambitions of people in general to read and write. If this was the case, how then can texts on the Web be communicative at all? This article shall explain how written text fits into the frame of the Web, though. Comparing the quality and manner of communication via Web texts with communication via classical text media (e.g. books) will answer the question why we still deal with written text on the Web and succeed in doing so.

2007-06-27 11:53 | ,

What Actually Is a Text?

Traditionally, a text used to be understood as a piece of written language, say a poem, a novel or a single chapter in a book (see Fairclough 1995). To modern linguists a text is “[…] any instance of living language that is playing some part in a context of situation […]. It may be either spoken or written, or indeed in any other medium of expression that we like to think of” (Halliday & Hasan 1989, p 10). Essentially, a text is a semantic unit that cannot simply be “defined as being just another kind of sentence, only bigger” (Halliday & Hasan 1989, p 10). It is rather the inherent meaning that defines a unit of language a text, although this meaning is still coded in words or structures, which in turn have to be recoded in sounds or letters, as Halliday & Hasan (1989) further explain.

2007-06-24 20:21 |

E-Commerce and What Can Be Read between the Lines

Any Web site, whether a private home page or an e-commerce platform, follows certain plans and motivations that are related to the idea of the whole. Media companies therefore use their Web site to bring the latest news to the public; computer systems companies intend to sell computers and accessories; hobby Web sites try to entertain people with animations, interactive jokes, or games; and publishers of serious content provide concise facts about specific topics. So, information on the Web always serves certain functions and ambitions. For this shall be the context of my concerns, I will make a few remarks on e-commerce in this and the following postings.

2007-06-23 18:37 | ,

Remarks on Terminology -or- The Primordial Ooze

To be as precise as possible during the following discussions, I will introduce some of the very basic concepts from computer science and ‘Web jargon’. Occasionally, certain expressions are used inappropriately among Internet users but in literature as well, which may cause confusion and misunderstanding. For a profound discussion of my topic, as it is strongly related to Internet issues, defining particular concepts will be necessary, as there are so many different notions at which even experts on their fields often stumble1. For that purpose, I have picked out definitions from some of the most accessed online glossaries of computer and Internet items. Web professionals may forgive me for coming up with Adam and Eve again, but I often recognise wrong usage and spelling which should better be clarified right from the beginning.

2007-06-18 21:12 |

Add to Technorati Favorites

Favourite Web writing resources

Recommended surfing