linguistics

Remarks on Text Typology (Part 2): A Text Typology on 'Webvertising'?

Usually, texts can be classified according to the writer’s intention. The outcome of such a classification refers to the genre of a text, i.e. a text may be explaining, instructing, recounting, describing, arguing, or narrating. Moreover, genres are to be distinguished from text types, which may be letters, plays, sonnets, formal debates, and so on. It appears to be the case that print texts, which of course have a much longer tradition in linguistics, are better represented by such classifications. Thus, I will not attempt to classify Web texts in terms of conventional text typology.

2007-11-04 01:46 |

From Linguistics to Human Factors

Up to this point, I have shed light on many different aspects of Web texts from a linguistic and communicative point of view. I have explained that a modern approach towards text linguistics has a broader conception of a particular piece of language; consequently, an author must also consider the context of the intended discourse that a text shall be part of. According to the communicative dilemma of written texts, the context in which a text shall be understood must be given in the text.

2007-09-28 09:56 | ,

What Actually Is a Text?

Traditionally, a text used to be understood as a piece of written language, say a poem, a novel or a single chapter in a book (see Fairclough 1995). To modern linguists a text is “[…] any instance of living language that is playing some part in a context of situation […]. It may be either spoken or written, or indeed in any other medium of expression that we like to think of” (Halliday & Hasan 1989, p 10). Essentially, a text is a semantic unit that cannot simply be “defined as being just another kind of sentence, only bigger” (Halliday & Hasan 1989, p 10). It is rather the inherent meaning that defines a unit of language a text, although this meaning is still coded in words or structures, which in turn have to be recoded in sounds or letters, as Halliday & Hasan (1989) further explain.

2007-06-24 21:21 |

The Use of Literature on Web Linguistics and Usability

Whereas traditional literature on the fields of discourse analysis and text linguistics is – as one would have expected – very much at hand, useful literature (including online papers) on the particular concerns of Web linguistics are rare and ambiguous. Indeed, the topic is widely discussed among a variety of Web sites, but scientific standards, such as giving references or providing the information necessary for citing these publications, are often ignored . Therefore, I only used a few online papers for my discussion on Web linguistics. These however have been derived from reliable sources, as far as I can say.

2007-06-12 22:26 |

The Use of Literature on Classical Linguistics and Related Topics

As a company’s goals determine the discourse that the Web content must serve, I have approached linguistic questions from the perspective of discourse analysis. That is, I have studied the relationship between the language (Web texts) and the context in which it is used (i.e. e-commerce), following Book recommendation / advertisement: Buy this book at amazon.com/.co.uk/.de! McCarthy’s (1991) definition of discourse analysis.

2007-06-09 13:46 |

Introduction: (Still) growing Internet usage necessitates Web texts that work out

During the last ten to fifteen years the Internet has become an important factor to conduct many of our daily activities at home and on the job. As a medium of information and communication the Internet reached indispensable status for business and science, but for private usage as well.

2007-05-06 10:04 |

Yet another blog?

Corporate blogs seem to spring up like mushrooms these days. However, this one is different. Instead of praising our agency’s latest projects in order to get some PR out of it, we will share some valid knowledge and true research on a matter that most of the World Wide Web consists of: text.

2007-04-16 23:44 |

Literature

2007-04-16 20:29 | ,

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