text

How Users Read the Web

Certainly, there are many Web users who print out some information from the Web if they need it at a later date, for they do not want to rely on retrieving the information after leaving the Web site (see Book recommendation / advertisement: Buy this book at amazon.com/.co.uk/.de! Nielsen 2000). “Sometimes, the remote server will be down, sometimes the webmaster has removed the page, and sometimes the users are simply not able to find the page a second time.” (Book recommendation / advertisement: Buy this book at amazon.com/.co.uk/.de! Nielsen 2000, p 94) Nonetheless, the main interest in Web sites is immediate access to online information; this is what the whole thing is all about.

2007-10-17 12:50 |

Hypertext

The most important characteristic of the Web in general, and – at the same time – the Web’s foundation and materialisation is its ‘hypertext’ structure. In order to define hypertext, the simplest way is to contrast it with traditional texts, as e.g. my M.A. thesis. Reading this paper means that there is “a single linear sequence defining the order in which the text is to be read” (Nielsen 1995, p 1), that is from chapter 1 to chapter 5. “Hypertext is non-sequential; there is no single order that determines the sequence […].” (Nielsen 1995, p 1)

2007-09-25 09:47 |

Text Meets Design

After a four weeks summer break I will continue with a topic that matters much to me and to the work of our design agency. This posting is all about the relevance of Web design issues for text production, for which I will present three reasons, leading to a Web designs credo that we follow day by day.

2007-09-05 09:32 |

Speaking Geek and Other Bloopers

As I have announced in the previous posting, Johnson (2003) has identified a couple of mistakes that publishers of Web sites frequently make, as they may not be aware of the communicative dilemma of Web texts. Some very basic ideas are given in this article in order to sensitise the readers of my blog to make up their minds about something so trivial – but with an enormous impact on successful communication.

2007-07-06 21:26 | ,

Context of Online Communication: A Communicative Dilemma

Now that we are reassured to rely on the written text for communication on the Web (see the previous posting), we may move towards another important aspect that Web authors must be aware of. Kana et al. (2003) have described a communicative dilemma of Web texts (and written text in general) that represents THE competitive challenge in writing for the Web.

2007-07-05 18:57 | ,

The Role of Written Text for Online Communication

According to Book recommendation / advertisement: Buy this book at amazon.com/.co.uk/.de! Kana et al. (2003), critics of our modern culture find fault with lacking ambitions of people in general to read and write. If this was the case, how then can texts on the Web be communicative at all? This article shall explain how written text fits into the frame of the Web, though. Comparing the quality and manner of communication via Web texts with communication via classical text media (e.g. books) will answer the question why we still deal with written text on the Web and succeed in doing so.

2007-06-27 11:53 | ,

What Actually Is a Text?

Traditionally, a text used to be understood as a piece of written language, say a poem, a novel or a single chapter in a book (see Fairclough 1995). To modern linguists a text is “[…] any instance of living language that is playing some part in a context of situation […]. It may be either spoken or written, or indeed in any other medium of expression that we like to think of” (Halliday & Hasan 1989, p 10). Essentially, a text is a semantic unit that cannot simply be “defined as being just another kind of sentence, only bigger” (Halliday & Hasan 1989, p 10). It is rather the inherent meaning that defines a unit of language a text, although this meaning is still coded in words or structures, which in turn have to be recoded in sounds or letters, as Halliday & Hasan (1989) further explain.

2007-06-24 20:21 |

E-Commerce and What Can Be Read between the Lines

Any Web site, whether a private home page or an e-commerce platform, follows certain plans and motivations that are related to the idea of the whole. Media companies therefore use their Web site to bring the latest news to the public; computer systems companies intend to sell computers and accessories; hobby Web sites try to entertain people with animations, interactive jokes, or games; and publishers of serious content provide concise facts about specific topics. So, information on the Web always serves certain functions and ambitions. For this shall be the context of my concerns, I will make a few remarks on e-commerce in this and the following postings.

2007-06-23 18:37 | ,

The Use of Literature on Web Linguistics and Usability

Whereas traditional literature on the fields of discourse analysis and text linguistics is – as one would have expected – very much at hand, useful literature (including online papers) on the particular concerns of Web linguistics are rare and ambiguous. Indeed, the topic is widely discussed among a variety of Web sites, but scientific standards, such as giving references or providing the information necessary for citing these publications, are often ignored . Therefore, I only used a few online papers for my discussion on Web linguistics. These however have been derived from reliable sources, as far as I can say.

2007-06-12 21:26 |

The Use of Literature on Classical Linguistics and Related Topics

As a company’s goals determine the discourse that the Web content must serve, I have approached linguistic questions from the perspective of discourse analysis. That is, I have studied the relationship between the language (Web texts) and the context in which it is used (i.e. e-commerce), following Book recommendation / advertisement: Buy this book at amazon.com/.co.uk/.de! McCarthy’s (1991) definition of discourse analysis.

2007-06-09 12:46 |

Introduction: (Still) growing Internet usage necessitates Web texts that work out

During the last ten to fifteen years the Internet has become an important factor to conduct many of our daily activities at home and on the job. As a medium of information and communication the Internet reached indispensable status for business and science, but for private usage as well.

2007-05-06 09:04 |

Again, why writing about text?

Because textual communication is rich but cheap, fast but discrete. And what is most striking here, as you will learn from my research that is to be published throughout this blog, people have never written that much before, since the emerge of the Internet. Can there be a better reason for approaching the Web from a linguistic perspective?

2007-04-18 14:51 |

Yet another blog?

Corporate blogs seem to spring up like mushrooms these days. However, this one is different. Instead of praising our agency’s latest projects in order to get some PR out of it, we will share some valid knowledge and true research on a matter that most of the World Wide Web consists of: text.

2007-04-16 22:44 |

Literature

2007-04-16 19:29 | ,

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